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Get your own commemorative brass coin, created by the USS Constitution Museum to honor "Old Ironsides" epic battles at sea, including the Great Chase - the harrowing escape from a British armada off the New Jersey coast in 1812. 🇺🇸 ⚓

Get your coin today: bit.ly/3zLjvab

🎨 Close-up of an oil on canvas painting by the American marine artist Julian Oliver (J. O.) Davidson (1853-1894), USS Constitution Museum Collection. Members of the New York Yacht Club Gift.
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Get your own commemorative brass coin, created by the USS Constitution Museum to honor Old Ironsides epic battles at sea, including the Great Chase - the harrowing escape from a British armada off the New Jersey coast in 1812.  🇺🇸 ⚓ 

Get your coin today: https://bit.ly/3zLjvab

🎨 Close-up of an oil on canvas painting by the American marine artist Julian Oliver (J. O.) Davidson (1853-1894), USS Constitution Museum Collection. Members of the New York Yacht Club Gift.

#OnThisDay - The unrelenting multi-day "Great Chase" ended as the ominous clouds of a squall built on the horizon. Knowing that the British had copied everything he had done thus far, USS CONSTITUTION Captain Isaac Hull took a gamble and ordered the ship's sails furled. The British, not used to the weather in American waters, followed suit. As soon as the squall struck, Hull quickly spread his sails again and seized upon the squall, leaving the British in his wake. 👏 👏

#TheGreatChase
#OldIronsides
#Undefeated
#OTD

📸 Courtesy US Navy
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#OnThisDay - The unrelenting multi-day Great Chase ended as the ominous clouds of a squall built on the horizon. Knowing that the British had copied everything he had done thus far, USS CONSTITUTION Captain Isaac Hull took a gamble and ordered the ships sails furled. The British, not used to the weather in American waters, followed suit. As soon as the squall struck, Hull quickly spread his sails again and seized upon the squall, leaving the British in his wake. 👏 👏 

#TheGreatChase
#OldIronsides
#Undefeated
#OTD

📸 Courtesy US Navy

We are thrilled to have great Navy Yard partners! Huzzah! ... See MoreSee Less

We are thrilled to have great Navy Yard partners! Huzzah!Image attachmentImage attachment+2Image attachment

#OnThisDay in 1812 the Great Chase continues! Outnumbered by five British Ships, USS CONSTITUTION turned and ran... but didn't get far because the wind died away. Captain Isaac Hull immediately made the best of the situation. 🇺🇸

He ordered guns moved aft and ports cut through the stern, so he could fire behind the ship. Meanwhile, the crew began jettisoning provisions to lighten the ship’s weight. 🧠 💪

In a clever maneuver called "kedging," the ship’s boats began towing the ship away from the enemy. This operation involved carrying a kedge anchor as far ahead of the ship as the cable would allow. Once the anchor settled in the seabed, the crew hauled in the cable, and the ship was pulled forward through the water. As the first anchor came aboard, a boat dropped a second anchor ahead of the ship, keeping it in constant motion. You can see the boats ahead of the ship doing this maneuver in a close-up of the painting by Julian Oliver (J.O.) Davidson from 1884.

This worked well, but the British soon discovered the trick and deployed their own anchors. HMS Shannon, the frigate closest to the Americans, quickly closed the gap. 😱

#ToBeContinued
#Staytuned
#Staytunedides
#TheGreatChase
#OTD
... See MoreSee Less

#OnThisDay in 1812 the Great Chase continues! Outnumbered by five British Ships, USS CONSTITUTION turned and ran... but didnt get far because the wind died away. Captain Isaac Hull immediately made the best of the situation. 🇺🇸

He ordered guns moved aft and ports cut through the stern, so he could fire behind the ship. Meanwhile, the crew began jettisoning provisions to lighten the ship’s weight. 🧠 💪 

In a clever maneuver called kedging, the ship’s boats began towing the ship away from the enemy. This operation involved carrying a kedge anchor as far ahead of the ship as the cable would allow. Once the anchor settled in the seabed, the crew hauled in the cable, and the ship was pulled forward through the water. As the first anchor came aboard, a boat dropped a second anchor ahead of the ship, keeping it in constant motion. You can see the boats ahead of the ship doing this maneuver in a close-up of the painting by Julian Oliver (J.O.) Davidson from 1884.

This worked well, but the British soon discovered the trick and deployed their own anchors. HMS Shannon, the frigate closest to the Americans, quickly closed the gap. 😱

#ToBeContinued
#Staytuned
#Staytunedides
#TheGreatChase
#OTD

2 CommentsComment on Facebook

You'll notice how strong sailors were back then. That is a 400 pound anchor that fellow is holding. And the officer with the Civil War uniform is equally impressive. And I believe Constitution was mounting a Double Dolphin Striker at the time. 🙂

So epic!

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